Diary, May/Jun 1665 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 18,238 / 54 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 73.4
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 769
mnybks.net#: 5586
Genre: Biography

only after dinner to the tryall of some experiments about making of coaches easy. And several we tried; but one did prove mighty easy (not here for me to describe, but the whole body of the coach lies upon one long spring), and we all, one after another, rid in it; and it is very fine and likely to take. These experiments were the intent of their coming, and pretty they are. Thence back by coach to Greenwich, and in his pleasure boat to Deptford, and there stopped and in to Mr. Evelyn’s,–[Sayes Court, the well-known residence of John Evelyn.]–which is a most beautiful place; but it being dark and late, I staid not; but Deane Wilkins and Mr. Hooke and I walked to Redriffe; and noble discourse all day long did please me, and it being late did take them to my house to drink, and did give them some sweetmeats, and thence sent them with a lanthorn home, two worthy persons as are in England, I think, or the world. So to my Lady Batten, where my wife is tonight, and so after some merry talk home and to bed.

Diary, May/Jun 1663 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 33,471 / 92 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 71.3
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 759
mnybks.net#: 5571
Genre: Biography

are paid, and then the land goes to Tom and the burden of paying all debts will fall upon the rest of the land. Not that I would do my brother any real hurt. I advised my father to good husbandry and to living within the compass of L50 a year, and all in such kind words, as not only made, them but myself to weep, and I hope it will have a good effect. That being done, and all things agreed on, we went down, and after a glass of wine we all took horse, and I, upon a horse hired of Mr. Game, saw him out of London, at the end of Bishopsgate Street, and so I turned and rode, with some trouble, through the fields, and then Holborn, &c., towards Hide Park, whither all the world, I think, are going, and in my going, almost thither, met W. Howe coming galloping upon a little crop black nag; it seems one that was taken in some ground of my Lord’s, by some mischance being left by his master, a thief; this horse being found with black cloth ears on, and a false mayne, having none of his own; and I back again wit

Diary, May/Jun 1662 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 17,839 / 52 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 86.9
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 747
mnybks.net#: 5563
Genre: Biography

I told him I thought he was better stored with than myself, before Sir George. So that I see I must keep a greater distance than I have done, and I hope I may do it because of the interest which I am making with Sir George. To bed all alone, and my Will in the truckle bed.

[According to the original Statutes of Corpus Christi Coll. Oxon, a Scholar slept in a truckle bed below each Fellow. Called also “a trindle bed.” Compare Hall’s description of an obsequious tutor:

“He lieth in a truckle bed While his young master lieth o’er his head.”

Satires, ii. 6, 5.

The bed was drawn in the daytime under the high bed of the tutor. See Wordsworth’s “University Life in the Eighteenth Century.”–M. B.]


2nd. Early to coach again and to Kingston, where we baited a little, and presently to coach again and got early to London, and I found all well at home, and Mr. Hunt and his wi

Diary, May 1668 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 13,451 / 41 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 68.9
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 841
mnybks.net#: 5620
Genre: Biography

appealing to the Commons, the Lords vote their petition a libell; and so there is like to follow very hot work. Thence by water, not being able to get a coach, nor boat but a sculler, and that with company, is being so foul a day, to the Old Swan, and so home, and there spent the evening, making Balty read to me, and so to supper and to bed.


2nd. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon with Lord Brouncker in his coach as far as the Temple, and there ‘light and to Hercules Pillars, and there dined, and thence to the Duke of York’s playhouse, at a little past twelve, to get a good place in the pit, against the new play, and there setting a poor man to keep my place, I out, and spent an hour at Martin’s, my bookseller’s, and so back again, where I find the house quite full. But I had my place, and by and by the King comes and the Duke of York; and then the play begins, called “The Sullen Lovers; or, The Impertinents,” having many good humours in it, but the play tedious, and no design at all in i

Diary, May 1667 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 19,999 / 57 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 46
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 736
mnybks.net#: 5607
Genre: Biography

On May-day now no garlands go, For milkmaids and their dance are banish’d.”

Hone’s Every-Day Book, vol. i., pp. 569, 570.]

and saw pretty Nelly standing at her lodgings’ door in Drury-lane in her smock sleeves and bodice, looking upon one: she seemed a mighty pretty creature. To the Hall and there walked a while, it being term. I thence home to the Rose, and then had Doll Lane venir para me . . . . To my Lord Crew’s, where I found them at dinner, and among others. Mrs. Bocket, which I have not seen a long time, and two little dirty children, and she as idle a prating and impertinent woman as ever she was. After dinner my Lord took me alone and walked with me, giving me an account of the meeting of the Commissioners for Accounts, whereof he is one. How some of the gentlemen, Garraway, Littleton, and others, did scruple at their first coming there, being called thither to act, as Members of Parliament, which they could not do by any authority but that of

Diary, May 1660 by Samuel Pepys

Author: Samuel Pepys
Language: English
Wordcount: 17,686 / 53 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 70.1
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 765
mnybks.net#: 5547
Genre: Biography

y, and found it was to save the coxon of the Cheriton, who, dropping overboard, could not be saved, but was drowned. To-day I put on my suit that was altered from the great skirts to little ones. To-day I hear they were very merry at Deal, setting up the King’s flag upon one of their maypoles, and drinking his health upon their knees in the streets, and firing the guns, which the soldiers of the Castle threatened; but durst not oppose.


2nd. In the morning at a breakfast of radishes at the Purser’s cabin. After that to writing till dinner. At which time comes Dunne from London, with letters that tell us the welcome news of the Parliament’s votes yesterday, which will be remembered for the happiest May-day that bath been many a year to England. The King’s letter was read in the House, wherein he submits himself and all things to them, as to an Act of Oblivion to all,

[“His Majesty added thereunto an excellent Declaration for the safety and repose of those, who tortured in their conscience

Gilbert Keith Chesterton by Maisie Ward Sheed

Author: Maisie Ward Sheed
Published: 1943
Language: English
Wordcount: 238,258 / 682 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 53.2
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 848
Added to site: 2006.06.29
mnybks.net#: 13703
Genres: Biography, Criticism, Post-1930

es, or those (too many alas) which are out of print and hard to obtain. But whenever possible in illustrating his mental history I have used unpublished material, so that even the most ardent Chestertonian will find much that is new to him.

For the period of Gilbert’s youth there are many exercise books, mostly only half filled, containing sketches and caricatures, lists of tithes for short stories and chapters, unfinished short stories. Several completed fairy stories and some of the best drawings were published in The Coloured Lands. Others are hints later used in his own novels: there is a fragment of The Ball and the Cross, a first suggestion for The Man Who Was Thursday, a rather more developed adumbration of The Napoleon of Notting Hill. This I think is later than most of the notebooks; but, after the change in handwriting, apparently deliberately and carefully made by Gilbert around the date at which he left St. Paul’s for the Slade School, it is almost imposs

The False Nun by Giacomo Casanova

Translated by Arthur Machen.

Author: Giacomo Casanova (Jacques Casanova de Seingalt)
Published: 1894
Language: English
Wordcount: 34,031 / 97 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 68.8
LoC Category: CT
Series: Memoirs of Casanova

Downloads: 1,003
mnybks.net#: 1586
Genre: Biography

is to me, “to renew acquaintance with you, since I heard from madame that we had known each other in Paris.”

With these words he looked at me attentively, as people will do when they are trying to recollect a person whom they have lost sight of. I then told him that we had never spoken to one another, and that he had not seen enough of me to recollect my features now.

“I had the honour,” I added, “to dine with your excellency at M. de Mocenigo’s house, but you talked all the time with Marshal Keith, the Prussian ambassador, and I was not fortunate enough to attract your attention. As you were on the point of leaving Paris to return to Venice, you went away almost immediately after dinner, and I have never had the honour of seeing you since that time.”

“Now I recollect you,” he answered, “and I remember asking whether you were not the secretary of the embassy. But from this day we shall not forget each other again, for the mysteries which unite us are of a nature likely to establish a lasting intima