Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 2 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Language: English
Wordcount: 157,055 / 492 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 47.5
LoC Category: AE
Series: Encyclopaedia Britannica

Downloads: 927
Added to site: 2009.12.16
mnybks.net#: 26038
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

f this decision by the Democratic party did it considerable credit.

Since 1877 the Southern states have been almost solidly Democratic; but, except on the negro question, such unanimity among Southern whites has been, naturally, factitious; and by no means an unmixed good for the party. Apart from the “Solid South,” the period after 1875 is characterized by two other party difficulties. The first was the attempt from 1878 to 1896 to “straddle” the silver issue;[7] the second, an attempt after 1896 to harmonize general elements of conservatism and radicalism within the party. In 1896 the South and West gained control of the organization, and the national campaigns of 1896 and 1900 were fought and lost mainly on the issue of “free silver,” which, however, was abandoned before 1904. After 1898 “imperialism,” to which the Democrats were hostile, became another issue. Finally, after 1896, there became very apparent in the party a tendency to attract the radical elements of society in the general re-alignmen

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 10 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 184,501 / 587 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 51.2
LoC Category: AE

Downloads: 662
Added to site: 2011.06.25
mnybks.net#: 30238
Genre: Reference

must be admitted, a theoretical conception due to a desire for symmetry, and was not confirmed by anything better than some erroneous observations on certain fossils, which were supposed to show a plate at the oral pole between the five orals; but this plate, so far as it exists at all, is now known to be nothing but an oral shifted in position. The theory was that all the plates just described, and more particularly those of the cup, which were termed “the calycinal system,” could be traced, not merely in all crinoids, but in all Echinoderms, whether fixed forms such as cystids and blastoids, or free forms such as ophiuroids and echinoids, even–with the eye of faith–in holothurians. It was admitted that these elements might atrophy, or be displaced, or be otherwise obscured; but their complete and symmetrical disposition was regarded as typical and original. Thus the genera exhibiting it were regarded as primitive, and those orders and classes in which it was least obscured were supposed to approach most n

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 2 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 63,818 / 205 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 50
LoC Category: AE
Series: Encyclopaedia Britannica

Downloads: 964
Added to site: 2010.01.12
mnybks.net#: 26292
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

by the column of Constantine and the mosque Nuri-Osmanieh; the 3rd by the war office, the Seraskereate Tower and the mosque of Sultan Suleiman; the 4th by the mosque of Sultan Mahommed II., the Conqueror; the 5th by the mosque of Sultan Selim; the 6th by Tekfour Serai and the quarter of Egri Kapu; the 7th by Avret Tash and the quarter of Psamatia. In Byzantine times the two last hills were named respectively the hill of Blachernae and the Xerolophos or dry hill.

History, Architecture and Antiquities.–Constantinople is famous in history, first as the capital of the Roman empire in the East for more than eleven centuries (330-1453), and secondly as the capital of the Ottoman empire since 1453. In respect of influence over the course of human affairs, its only rivals are Athens, Rome and Jerusalem. Yet even the gifts of these rivals to the cause of civilization often bear the image and superscription of Constantinople upon them. Roman law, Greek literature, the theology of the Christian church,

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 1 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 6,896 / 31 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 55.8
LoC Categories: AE, AI

Downloads: 943
Added to site: 2010.01.16
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Genre: Reference

Richard Cosway, R.A.; George Engleheart; Portrait Drawings; &c. Editor of new edition of Bryan’s Dictionary of Painters and Engravers.

Cooper, Alexander; Cooper, Samuel; Cosway, Richard.

G. F. Z. G. F. ZIMMER, A.M.INST.C.E., F.Z.S. Author of Mechanical Handling of Material.

Conveyors.

G. H. Fo. GEORGE HERBERT FOWLER, F.Z.S., F.L.S., PH.D. Formerly Berkeley Fellow of Owens College, Manchester, and Assistant Professor of Zoology at University College, London.

Ctenophora.

G. J. T. GEORGE JAMES TURNER. Barrister-at-Law, Lincoln’s Inn. Editor of Select Pleas of the Forest for the Selden Society.

County.

G. P. R. GERALD PHILIP ROBINSON. President of the Society of Mezzotint Engravers. Mezzotint Engraver to Queen Victoria and to King Edward VII.

Cousins, Samuel.

G. Sa. GEORGE SAINTSBURY, L.L.D., LITT.D. See the biographical article: SAINTSBURY, G. E. B.

Corneille, Pierre; Corneille, Thom

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 4 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 182,708 / 578 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 66
LoC Category: AE
Series: Encyclopaedia Britannica

Downloads: 896
Added to site: 2010.03.15
mnybks.net#: 27013
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

s been transferred to the large and widespread genus Senecio. Cinerarias can be raised freely from seeds. For spring flowering in England the seeds are sown in April or May in well-drained pots or pans, in soil of three parts loam to two parts leaf-mould, with one-sixth sand; cover the seed thinly with fine soil, and press the surface firm. When the seedlings are large enough to handle, prick them out in pans or pots of similar soil, and when more advanced pot them singly in 4-in. pots, using soil a trifle less sandy. They should be grown in shallow frames facing the north, and, if so situated that the sun shines upon the plants in the middle of the day, they must be slightly shaded; give plenty of air, and never allow them to get dry. When well established with roots, shift them into 6-in. pots, which should be liberally supplied with manure water as they get filled with roots. In winter remove to a pit or house, where a little heat can be supplied whenever there is a risk of their getting frozen. T

Fires and Firemen by Anonymous

From The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art Vol XXXV. – No. I May, 1855

Author: Anonymous
Published: 1855
Language: English
Wordcount: 9,007 / 35 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 60.4
LoC Category: AG

Downloads: 583
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Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

ion of fires even extends to the brute creation. Who has not heard of the dog “Chance,” who first formed his acquaintance with the Brigade by following a fireman from a conflagration in Shoreditch to the central station at Watling-street? Here, after he had been petted for some little time by the men, his master came for him, and took him home; but he escaped on the first opportunity, and returned to the station. After he had been carried back for the third time, his master–like a mother whose son will go to sea–allowed him to have his own way, and for years he invariably accompanied the engine, now upon the machine, now under the horses’ legs, and always, when going up-hill, running in advance, and announcing the welcome advent of the extinguisher by his bark. At the fire he used to amuse himself with pulling burning logs of wood out of the flames with his mouth. Although he had his legs broken half a dozen times, he remained faithful to his pursuit; till at last, having received a severer hurt than usual,

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 183,442 / 570 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 62.2
LoC Category: AE
Series: Encyclopaedia Britannica

Downloads: 972
Added to site: 2010.03.01
mnybks.net#: 26832
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

court sat for the last time in 1737. The heraldic side of its duties are now vested in the earl marshal as head of the Heralds’ College.


CHIVASSO, a town and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Turin, 18 m. N.E. by rail from the town of Turin, 600 ft. above sea-level. Pop. (1901) 4169 (town), 9804 (commune). It is situated on the left bank of the Po, near the influx of the Orco. The cathedral is of the 15th century with a fine façade ornamented with statues in terra-cotta. It was an important fortress in the middle ages, and until 1804, when the French dismantled it. One tower only of the old castle of the marquesses of Monferrato, who possessed the town from 1164 to 1435, remains. Chivasso is on the main line from Turin to Milan, and is the junction of branches for Aosta and Casale Monferrato.


CHIVE (Allium Schoenoprasum), a hardy perennial plant, with small narrow bulbs tufted on short root-stocks and long cylindrical hollow leaves. It is found in the

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1911
Language: English
Wordcount: 199,878 / 623 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 53.2
LoC Category: AE
Series: Encyclopaedia Britannica

Downloads: 1,036
Added to site: 2010.02.20
mnybks.net#: 26721
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Reference

with special honour, and Bishop Repingdon of Lincoln, ex-Wycliffite, was one of the new batch of cardinals created on the 18th of September 1408, most of Gregory’s cardinals having deserted him. These, together with Benedict’s revolting cardinals, summoned a general council at Pisa. In November 1408 Chicheley was back at Westminster, when Henry IV. received the cardinal archbishop of Bordeaux and determined to support the cardinals at Pisa against both popes. In January 1409 Chicheley was named with Bishop Hallum of Salisbury and the prior of Canterbury to represent the Southern Convocation at the council, which opened on the 25th of March 1409, arriving on the 24th of April. Obedience was withdrawn from both the existing popes, and on the 26th of June a new pope elected instead of them. Chicheley and the other envoys were received on their return as saviours of the world; though the result was summed up by a contemporary as trischism instead of schism, and the Church as giving three husbands instead of two.