The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1 by Marcus Tullius Cicero

Translated by Evelyn S. Shuckburgh.

Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Published: 1899
Language: English
Wordcount: 169,823 / 487 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 57.1
LoC Category: AC

Downloads: 1,483
Added to site: 2007.04.23
mnybks.net#: 16670
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Correspondence

th might still be a bar to the consulship. His father, M. Tullius, lived at Arpinum, an ancient city of the Volscians and afterwards of the Samnites, which had long enjoyed a partial, and from B.C. 188 a complete, Roman franchise, and was included in the Cornelian tribe. Cicero’s mother’s name was Helvia, of whom we know nothing but the one anecdote told by Quintus (Fam. xvi. 26), who says that she used to seal the wine jars when they were emptied, so that none might be drained without her knowing it–a testimony to her economy and careful housewifery. His father had weak health and resided almost entirely in his villa at Arpinum, which he had considerably enlarged, much devoted to study and literature (de Leg. ii. 1). But though he apparently possessed considerable property, giving him equestrian rank, and though Cicero says that his family was very ancient, yet neither he nor any of his ancestors had held Roman magistracies. Marcus and his brother Quintus were the first of their family to

Letters of Edward FitzGerald to Fanny Kemble by Edward Fitzgerald

Author: Edward Fitzgerald
Published: 1895
Language: English
Wordcount: 68,945 / 199 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 76.1
LoC Category: CT

Downloads: 596
Added to site: 2007.05.15
mnybks.net#: 16941
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Correspondence

ou to answer–as answer I know you will. It is almost a Shame to put you to it by such a piece of inanity as this letter. But it is written: it is 10 p.m. A Pipe–and then to Bed–with what Appetite for Sleep one may.

And I am yours sincerely always

E. F.G.


VI.

WOODBRIDGE: June 6, [1872].

DEAR MRS. KEMBLE,

Some little while ago I saw in a London Book Catalogue ‘Smiles and Tears–a Comedy by Mrs. C. Kemble’–I had a curiosity to see this: and so bought it. Do you know it?–Would you like to have it? It seems to be ingeniously contrived, and of easy and natural Dialogue: of the half sentimental kind of Comedy, as Comedies then were (1815) with a serious–very serious–element in it–taken from your Mother’s Friend’s, Mrs. Opie’s (what a sentence!) story of ‘Father and Daughter’–the seduced Daughter, who finds her distracted Father writing her name on a Coffin he has drawn on the Wall of his Cell–All ends happily in the Play, however, whatever may be the

The Letters of Charles Dickens by Charles Dickens

Author: Charles Dickens
Published: 1880
Language: English
Wordcount: 81,230 / 249 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 72.4
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 1,940
Added to site: 2008.06.21
mnybks.net#: 21296
Genre: Correspondence

it as one “requiring attention.” I have no doubt it will receive it.

With reference to your letter bearing date on the 8th of last October, let me assure you that I have delayed answering it–not because a constant stream of similar epistles has rendered me callous to the anxieties of a beginner, in those doubtful paths in which I walk myself–but because you ask me to do that which I would scarce do, of my own unsupported opinion, for my own child, supposing I had one old enough to require such a service. To suppose that I could gravely take upon myself the responsibility of withdrawing you from pursuits you have already undertaken, or urging you on in a most uncertain and hazardous course of life, is really a compliment to my judgment and inflexibility which I cannot recognize and do not deserve (or desire). I hoped that a little reflection would show you how impossible it is that I could be expected to enter upon a task of so much delicacy, but as you have written to me since, and called (unfortuna

The Letters of Charles Dickens by Charles Dickens

Author: Charles Dickens
Published: 1880
Language: English
Wordcount: 137,153 / 400 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 73.1
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 1,951
Added to site: 2008.06.21
mnybks.net#: 21295
Genre: Correspondence

our note about the Golden Mary gave me great pleasure; though I don’t believe in one part of it; for I honestly believe that your story, as really belonging to the rest of the narrative, had been generally separated from the other stories, and greatly liked. I had not that particular shipwreck that you mention in my mind (indeed I doubt if I know it), and John Steadiman merely came into my head as a staunch sort of name that suited the character. The number has done “Household Words” great service, and has decidedly told upon its circulation.

You should have come to the play. I much doubt if anything so complete will ever be seen again. An incredible amount of pains and ingenuity was expended on it, and the result was most remarkable even to me.

When are you going to send something more to H. W.? Are you lazy?? Low-spirited??? Pining for Paris????

Ever affectionately.

[Sidenote: Mr. C. W. Dilke.]

OFFICE OF “HOUSEHOLD WORDS,” Thursday, March 19th, 1857.

The Letters of Charles Dickens by Charles Dickens

Author: Charles Dickens
Published: 1880
Language: English
Wordcount: 139,058 / 399 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 73.1
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 2,567
Added to site: 2008.06.21
mnybks.net#: 21294
Genre: Correspondence

p>

The two letters to Mr. Macready, at the end of this year, refer to a farce which Charles Dickens wrote, with an idea that it might be suitable for Covent Garden Theatre, then under Mr. Macready’s management.

[Sidenote: Mrs. Charles Dickens.]

GRETA BRIDGE, Thursday, Feb. 1st, 1838.

MY DEAREST KATE,

I am afraid you will receive this later than I could wish, as the mail does not come through this place until two o’clock to-morrow morning. However, I have availed myself of the very first opportunity of writing, so the fault is that mail’s, and not this.

We reached Grantham between nine and ten on Thursday night, and found everything prepared for our reception in the very best inn I have ever put up at. It is odd enough that an old lady, who had been outside all day and came in towards dinner time, turned out to be the mistress of a Yorkshire school returning from the holiday stay in London. She was a very queer old lady, and showed us a long letter she was carryin

The Letters of Cassiodorus by Cassiodorus

Translated with and introduction by Thomas Hodgkin

Author: Cassiodorus (Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator)
Published: 1886
Language: English
Wordcount: 183,121 / 602 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 56.3
LoC Category: JC

Downloads: 670
Added to site: 2006.06.16
mnybks.net#: 14011
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Non-fiction, Correspondence

elated with your success, be not gnawed with envy, rejoice not at the calamities of others; for what is hateful in the Sovereign cannot be becoming in the Quaestor.

‘Exercise the power of the Prince in the condition of a subject; and may you render a good account to the Judges at the end of your term of office.’

6. FORMULA OF THE MAGISTERIAL DIGNITY, AND ITS EXCELLENCY (MAGISTER OFFICIORUM).

[The dignity and powers of the Master of the Offices were continually rising throughout the Fourth and Fifth Centuries at the cost of the Praetorian Praefect, many of whose functions were transferred to the Master.]

[Sidenote: Mastership of the Offices.]

‘The Master’s is a name of dignity. To him belongs the discipline of the Palace; he calms the stormy ranks of the insolent Scholares [the household troops, 10,000 in number, in the palace of the Eastern Emperor, according to Lydus (ii. 24)]. He introduces the Senators to our presence, cheers them

Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Elinore Pruitt Stewart

The writer of the following letters is a young woman who lost her husband in a railroad accident and went to Denver to seek support for herself and her two-year-old daughter, Jerrine. Turning her hand to the nearest work, she went out by the day as house-cleaner and laundress. Later, seeking to better herself, she accepted employment as a housekeeper for a well-to-do Scotch cattle-man, Mr. Stewart, who had taken up a quarter-section in Wyoming. The letters, written through several years to a former employer in Denver, tell the story of her new life in the new country. They are genuine letters, and are printed as written, except for occasional omissions and the alteration of some of the names.

Author: Elinore Pruitt Stewart
Published: 1913
Language: English
Wordcount: 49,616 / 137 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.4
LoC Categories: CT, HQ

Downloads: 1,792
Added to site: 2005.08.31
mnybks.net#: 11548
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Non-fiction, Correspondence, Women’s Studies

nup and a glorious day we had. We followed a stream higher up into the mountains and the air was so keen and clear at first we had on our coats. There was a tang of sage and of pine in the air, and our horse was midside deep in rabbit-brush, a shrub just covered with flowers that look and smell like goldenrod. The blue distance promised many alluring adventures, so we went along singing and simply gulping in summer. Occasionally a bunch of sage chickens would fly up out of the sagebrush, or a jack rabbit would leap out. Once we saw a bunch of antelope gallop over a hill, but we were out just to be out, and game didn’t tempt us. I started, though, to have just as good a time as possible, so I had a fish-hook in my knapsack.

Presently, about noon, we came to a little dell where the grass was as soft and as green as a lawn. The creek kept right up against the hills on one side and there were groves of quaking asp and cottonwoods that made shade, and service-bushes and birches that shut off the ugly hills on t

A Letter from Mr. Cibber to Mr. Pope by Colley Cibber

Author: Colley Cibber
Published: 1742
Language: English
Wordcount: 18,898 / 62 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 68.1
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 443
Added to site: 2010.07.05
mnybks.net#: 28375
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Correspondence, Criticism

from such diversion as had been that day the lot of Pope.'[17]

If so, the other attacks must have been shattering, since they lacked even the surface good humor of Cibber’s Letter. Pope, at any rate, was concerned enough to tell Spence:

The story published by Cibber, as to the main point, is an absolute lie. I do remember that I was invited by Lord Warwick to pass an evening with him. He carried me and Cibber in his coach to a bawdy-house. There was a woman there, but I had nothing to do with her of the kind that Cibber mentions, to the best of my memory–and I had so few things of that kind ever on my hands that I could scarce have forgot it, especially so circumstanced as he pretends.[18]

An answer to the Letter was demanded, and it was not long in coming. In August/September, Pope wrote his friend Hugh Bethel concerning a copy of the New Dunciad he had sent him:

That poem has not done me, or my Quiet, the least harm; only it provokd Cibber to write a