The Scarlet Stigma by James Edgar Smith

Author: James Edgar Smith
Published: 1899
Language: English
Wordcount: 18,126 / 61 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 88.9
LoC Category: PS

Downloads: 271
Added to site: 2010.01.29
mnybks.net#: 26493
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Drama

months old.

Roger. Three months? Three years you mean.

Ursula. Three months, I said.

Roger. Thou dost not mean that Hester Prynne hath borne a child within the last two years?

Ursula. I do. [Aside] A strange man, truly. This news hath troubled him; but that’s not strange, it troubles all her friends. He seemed glad enough she had a child, but when I said it was a girl it seemed to sting him. Well, well! God help the women; we are unwelcome when we come, abused while we stay, and driven hence with ill-usage.

Roger. Adulteress! That cannot be! There’s some Mistake, or some deceit in this. Her great Nobility of heart would take upon Herself another’s wrong. I’ll take an oath The babe they say is hers she never bore!

Ursula. ‘Tis surely hers, for I delivered her.

Roger. Hester! Hester! O, my God! My Hester! Woman, didst thou say that she is married?

Ursula. Nay, I said she is a

Scarborough and the Critic by Richard B. Sheridan

Author: Richard B. Sheridan
Language: English
Wordcount: 33,874 / 112 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 89.9
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 349
mnybks.net#: 6402
Genre: Drama

ghter, ‘twould neither have hooked nor buttoned.
Lord Fop. Rat the hooks and buttons, sir! Can any thing be worse than this? As Gad shall jedge me, it hangs on my shoulders like a chairman’s surtout.
Tai. ‘Tis not for me to dispute your lordship’s fancy.
Lory. There, sir, observe what respect does.
Fash. Respect! damn him for a coxcomb!–But let’s accost
him.–[Coming forward.] Brother, I’m your humble servant. Lord Fop. O Lard, Tam! I did not expect you in England.
–Brother, I’m glad to see you.–But what has brought you to Scarborough, Tam!–[To the TAILOR.] Look you, sir, I
shall never be reconciled to this nauseous wrapping-gown,
therefore pray get me another suit with all possible expedition; for this is my eternal aversion.–[Exit TAILOR.] Well
but, Tam, you don’t tell me what has driven you to Scarborough.– Mrs. Calico, are not you of my mind?
Semp. Directly, my lord.–I hope your lordship is pleased with your ruffles?
Lord Fop. In love with them, stap my vitals!–Bring my
bill, you shall be paid to-morrow.
Semp. I humbly thank your worship. [Exit.]
Lord Fop. Hark thee, shoemaker, these shoes aren’t ugly,
but they don’t fit me.
Shoe. My lord, I think they fit you very well.
Lord Fop. They hurt me just below the instep.
Shoe. [Feels his foot.] No, my lord, they don’t
hurt you there.
Lord Fop. I tell thee they pinch me execrably.
Shoe. Why then, my lord, if those shoes pinch you, I’ll be damned.
Lord Fop. Why, will thou undertake to persuade me I cannot feel?
Shoe. Your lordship may please to feel what you think fit, but that shoe does not hurt you–I think I understand my trade. Lord Fop. Now, by all that’s good and powerful, thou art
an incomprehensive coxcomb!–but thou makest good shoes, and so I’ll bear with thee.

The Wonder-Working Magician by Pedro Calderón de la Barca

Author: Pedro Calderón de la Barca
Published: 1873
Language: English
Wordcount: 25,087 / 79 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 69.8
LoC Category: PQ

Downloads: 736
Added to site: 2009.06.15
mnybks.net#: 24421
Genre: Drama

the two preceding dramas, in the exact number of lines of the original. One passage of the translation which I published in 1853 is retained in the notes, as a tribute of respect to the memory of the late John Rutter Chorley, it having been mentioned with praise by that eminent Spanish scholar in an elaborate review of my earlier translations from Calderon, which appeared in the “Athenaeum”, Nov. 19 and Nov. 26, 1853.

It only remains to add that the text I have followed is that of Hartzenbusch in his edition of Calderon’s Comedias, Madrid, 1856 (“Biblioteca de Autores Espanoles”). His arrangement of the scenes has been followed throughout, thus enabling the reader in a moment to verify for himself the exactness of the translation by a reference to the original, a crucial test which I rather invite than decline.

CLAPHAM PARK, Easter, 1873.

* * * * *


THE WONDER-WORKING MAGICIAN.

TO THE MEMORY OF SHELLEY, WHOSE ADMIRATION FOR “THE LIGHT AND ODOUR OF THE FLOWERY AND STARRY

Savva and The Life of Man by Leonid Andreyev

Author: Leonid Andreyev
Language: English
Wordcount: 51,835 / 160 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 81.5
LoC Category: PT

Downloads: 549
Added to site: 2004.08.12
mnybks.net#: 8939
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Drama

elbows out, feet in. The motions of his hands are rounded and graceful, his palms being turned up as if he were carrying something. His features are large and rough-hewn, and his cheeks and chin are covered with a soft light down. When agitated or angry, he turns gray as dust, his movements become quick and agile, and his stoop disappears. He wears the blouse and boots of a workingman.

PELAGUEYA, a freckled, colorless woman, of about thirty, wearing the ordinary dress of her class. She is dirty and untidy.

SPERANSKY GRIGORY PETROVICH, an ex-seminarist; tall, very lean, with a pale, long face, and a tuft of dark hair on his chin. He has long, smooth hair parted in the middle and falling on each side of his face. He is dressed either in a long, dark overcoat or in a dark frock-coat.

FATHER KONDRATY, a friar, forty-two years old, ugly, narrow-chested, with swollen, animated eyes.

VASSYA, a novice, a strong and athletic youth of nineteen. He has a ro

Woman on Her Own, False Gods & The Red Robe by Eugène Brieux

Author: Eugène Brieux
Published: 1916
Language: English
Wordcount: 88,931 / 275 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 81.5
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 312
Added to site: 2008.11.09
mnybks.net#: 22585
Genre: Drama

te;LIAT. Are you sure you won’t regret Paris?

MADAME GUÉRET. Oh, no.

GUÉRET. For the last two years I’ve hated Paris.

MADAME GUÉRET. Since you began to play cards.

GUÉRET. For the last two years we’ve had the greatest difficulty in keeping up appearances. This lawyer absconding is the last blow.

FÉLIAT. Aren’t you afraid you will be horribly bored at La Tremblaye?

GUÉRET [rising] What are we to do?

FÉLIAT. Well, now listen to me. I told you–

René comes in and takes something off a table. Féliat stops suddenly.

RENÉ. Good-morning, uncle. [He hurries out]

FÉLIAT. Good-morning, René.

GUÉRET. He knows nothing about it yet?

FÉLIAT. No; and my sister-in-law asked me to tell him.

MADAME GUÉRET. Well, why shouldn’t you? If they are engaged, we know nothing about it.

GUÉRET.

Satyros oder Der vergoetterte Waldteufel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Language: German
Wordcount: 4,399 / 21 pg
LoC Category: PT

Downloads: 960
mnybks.net#: 7806
Genre: Drama

d, den Schutzgott meiner Ruh, Raubt mir das Ungeheuer dazu.

Eudora. O Freund! ich kenn sein Goetterblut wie du. Mein Mann ward Knecht in seiner eignen Wohnung, Und Ihre borstge Majestaet sah zur Belohnung Mich Hausfrau fuer einen arkadischen Schwan, Mein Ehbett fuer einen Rasen an, Sich drauf zu tummeln.

Einsiedler. Ich erkenn ihn dran.

Eudora. Ich schickt ihn mit Verachtung weg. Er hing Sich fester an Psyche, das arme Ding, Um mich zu trotzen! Und seit der Zeit Sterb ich oder seh dich befreit.

Einsiedler. Sie bereiten das Opfer heut.

Eudora. Die Gefahr lehrt uns bereit sein. Ich geb nichts verloren; Mit einem Blicke lenk ich ein Bei dem kuehnen eingebild’ten Toren.

Einsiedler. Und dann?

Eudora. Wann sie dich zum Opfer fuehren, Lock ich ihn an, sich zu verlieren In die innern heiligen Hallen, Aus Grossmut-Sanftmut-Schein. Da dring auf das Volk ein, Uns zu ueberfallen.

Einsiedler. Ich fuerchte –

Eudora. Fuerchte nicht! Einer, der um sein Leben spri

Mestarin nuuskarasia by Robert Kiljander

Author: Robert Kiljander
Language: Finnish
Wordcount: 6,367 / 31 pg
LoC Category: PH

Downloads: 446
Added to site: 2005.06.03
mnybks.net#: 10532
Genre: Drama

ii *velvollisuutenikin* minua tähän kokeeseen, sillä eihän kukaan voi olla varma siitä, jota hän ei vielä tutkinut ole. Kun pikkuruisen vaan pistän nuuskaa nenääni, olen heti asiasta selvillä. Jos se minulle nautintoa tuottaa, tiedän samassa, että mun edeskinpäin tulee yhä olla varuillani, ja ellei se taas tuotakaan mitään nautintoa, saan olla varma siitä, että jo olen päässyt tuosta pahasta tavastani. — Mitähän, jos nyt todellakin pistäisin tuota rahtuisen nenääni? Koetteeksi vaan. Olisinkohan silloin sanani syöjä? Mitä vielä, kun en sitä kerran himon pakosta tee, vaan ainoastaan koetellakseni itseäni. Mutta jos sattuisi joku tulemaan? Eikös mitä, tuossa tuokiossa se on tehty. Noh, olkoon menneeksi! _(Aikoo juuri nuuskata, kun Janne äkkiä astuu sisään. Vilho pistää nuuskarasian taskuunsa)._

KAHDEKSAS KOHTAUS.

_Vilho. Janne._

JANNE. Onko herra sulhainen nähnyt täällä mestarin nuuskarasiaa?

VILHO. Mestarinko nuuskarasiaa? E-e-ei, en minä muista sitä nähneeni.

JANNE. Kummallista! Hän sanoi jätt

A Woman of No Importance by Oscar Wilde

Author: Oscar Wilde
Published: 1893
Language: English
Wordcount: 22,206 / 70 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.6
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 7,281
mnybks.net#: 7510
Genre: Drama

hat Lord Illingworth is aiming at. I heard that he was offered Vienna. But that may not be true.

LADY CAROLINE. I don’t think that England should be represented abroad by an unmarried man, Jane. It might lead to complications.

LADY HUNSTANTON. You are too nervous, Caroline. Believe me, you are too nervous. Besides, Lord Illingworth may marry any day. I was in hopes he would have married lady Kelso. But I believe he said her family was too large. Or was it her feet? I forget which. I regret it very much. She was made to be an ambassador’s wife.

LADY CAROLINE. She certainly has a wonderful faculty of remembering people’s names, and forgetting their faces.

LADY HUNSTANTON. Well, that is very natural, Caroline, is it not? [To Footman.] Tell Henry to wait for an answer. I have written a line to your dear mother, Gerald, to tell her your good news, and to say she really must come to dinner.

[Exit Footman.]

GERALD. That is awfully kind of you, Lady Hunstanton. [To HESTER.] Will