Three Lives by Gertrude Stein

Stein’s first published work, consisting of three three stories set in the fictional town of Bridgepoint: “The Good Anna,” “Melanctha,” and “The Gentle Lena.”

Author: Gertrude Stein
Published: 1909
Language: English
Wordcount: 87,171 / 232 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 75.9
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 7,389
Added to site: 2005.03.19
mnybks.net#: 10054
Origin: gutenberg.org
More Info: en.wikipedia.org

Genres: Short Story Collection, Gay/Lesbian, Fiction and Literature

early in the street this morning, what was you doing there?”

“Nothing, Miss Annie, I just went out to see, that’s all and that’s the same banana, ‘deed it is Miss Annie.”

“Sallie, how can you say so and after all I do for you, and Miss Mathilda is so good to you. I never brought home no bananas yesterday with specks on it like that. I know better, it was that boy was here last night and ate it while I was away, and you was out to get another this morning. I don’t want no lying Sallie.”

Sallie was stout in her defence but then she gave it up and she said it was the boy who snatched it as he ran away at the sound of Anna’s key opening the outside door. “But I will never let him in again, Miss Annie, ‘deed I won’t,” said Sallie.

And now it was all peaceful for some weeks and then Sallie with fatuous simplicity began on certain evenings to resume her bright red waist, her bits of jewels and her crinkly hair.

One pleasant evening in the early spring, Miss Mathilda was standing o

Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust

Translated from the French by C. K. Scott Moncrieff.

Author: Marcel Proust
Published: 1922
Language: English
Wordcount: 196,406 / 543 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 40.3
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 12,346
mnybks.net#: 5783
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Gay/Lesbian

hould have to go up to bed, and to lie there, unsleeping, far from my mother and grandmother, my bedroom became the fixed point on which my melancholy and anxious thoughts were centred. Some one had had the happy idea of giving me, to distract me on evenings when I seemed abnormally wretched, a magic lantern, which used to be set on top of my lamp while we waited for dinner-time to come: in the manner of the master-builders and glass-painters of gothic days it substituted for the opaqueness of my walls an impalpable iridescence, supernatural phenomena of many colours, in which legends were depicted, as on a shifting and transitory window. But my sorrows were only increased, because this change of lighting destroyed, as nothing else could have done, the customary impression I had formed of my room, thanks to which the room itself, but for the torture of having to go to bed in it, had become quite endurable. For now I no longer recognised it, and I became uneasy, as though I were in a room in some hotel or furn

South Wind by Norman Douglas

A book totally unlike any other, inimitably humorous, packed full of philosophy, rich with irony, and interesting throughout, it satirizes everything from colonial history to conventional morality.

Author: Norman Douglas
Published: 1917
Language: English
Wordcount: 134,204 / 390 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 48.3
LoC Category: G

Downloads: 2,844
mnybks.net#: 2272
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Travel, Gay/Lesbian

iling priest, soon outstripped both of them, in spite of a ten minutes’ conversation on the quay with the pretty peasant girl of the steamer. He had engaged the fastest driver on the island, and was now tearing frantically up the road, determined to be the first to apprise the Duchess of the lunatic’s arrival.

CHAPTER II


The Duchess of San Martino, a kind-hearted and imposing lady of mature age who, under favourable atmospheric conditions (in winter-time, for instance, when the powder was not so likely to run down her face), might have passed, so far as profile was concerned, for a faded French beauty of bygone centuries–the Duchess was no exception to the rule.

It was an old rule. Nobody knew when it first came into vogue. Mr. Eames, bibliographer of Nepenthe, had traced it down to the second Phoenician period, but saw no reason why the Phoenicians, more than anybody else, should have established the precedent. On the con

The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham

Loosely based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin, the story is told as a series of glimpses into the life of Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stock broker who abandons his wife and children in order to pursue painting in Tahiti.

Author: W. Somerset Maugham
Published: 1919
Language: English
Wordcount: 74,778 / 212 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 66.5
LoC Category: PR
Series: World’s Best Reading

Downloads: 12,343
mnybks.net#: 4760
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Gay/Lesbian

before. Mr. Crabbe was as dead as mutton, but Mr. Crabbe continued to write moral stories in rhymed couplets. I have read desultorily the writings of the younger generation. It may be that among them a more fervid Keats, a more ethereal Shelley, has already published numbers the world will willingly remember. I cannot tell. I admire their polish — their youth is already so accomplished that it seems absurd to speak of promise — I marvel at the felicity of their style; but with all their copiousness (their vocabulary suggests that they fingered Roget’s Thesaurus in their cradles) they say nothing to me: to my mind they know too much and feel too obviously; I cannot stomach the heartiness with which they slap me on the back or the emotion with which they hurl themselves on my bosom; their passion seems to me a little anaemic and their dreams a trifle dull. I do not like them. I am on the shelf. I will continue to write moral stories in rhymed couplets. But I should be thrice a fool if I did it for a

Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life by Honoré de Balzac

Author: Honoré de Balzac
Published: 1847
Language: English
Wordcount: 194,328 / 556 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 70
LoC Category: PQ

Downloads: 3,900
Added to site: 2005.08.27
mnybks.net#: 11570
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Gay/Lesbian

ny great things. His vanity had triumphed in the previous encounter; he had shown himself as a rich man, happy and scornful, to two persons who had scorned him when he was poor and wretched. But how could a poet, like an old diplomate, run the gauntlet with two self-styled friends, who had welcomed him in misery, under whose roof he had slept in the worst of his troubles? Finot, Blondet, and he had groveled together; they had wallowed in such orgies as consume something more than money. Like soldiers who find no market for their courage, Lucien had just done what many men do in Paris: he had still further compromised his character by shaking Finot’s hand, and not rejecting Blondet’s affection.

Every man who has dabbled, or still dabbles, in journalism is under the painful necessity of bowing to men he despises, of smiling at his dearest foe, of compounding the foulest meanness, of soiling his fingers to pay his aggressors in their own coin. He becomes used to seeing evil done, and passing it over; he begin

The Girl with the Golden Eyes by Honoré de Balzac

The Girl with the Golden Eyes is the third part of a trilogy. Part one is entitled Ferragus and part two is The Duchesse de Langeais. The three stories are frequently combined under the title The Thirteen. Translated by Ellen Marriage.

Author: Honoré de Balzac
Language: English
Wordcount: 27,748 / 84 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 55.3
LoC Category: PQ
Series: The Thirteen

Downloads: 12,770
mnybks.net#: 796
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Gay/Lesbian

nd fits of creative energy. And then its pleasure, its repose, are an exhausting debauch, swarthy and black with blows, white with intoxication, or yellow with indigestion. It lasts but two days, but it steals to-morrow’s bread, the week’s soup, the wife’s dress, the child’s wretched rags. Men, born doubtless to be beautiful–for all creatures have a relative beauty–are enrolled from their childhood beneath the yoke of force, beneath the rule of the hammer, the chisel, the loom, and have been promptly vulcanized. Is not Vulcan, with his hideousness and his strength, the emblem of this strong and hideous nation–sublime in its mechanical intelligence, patient in its season, and once in a century terrible, inflammable as gunpowder, and ripe with brandy for the madness of revolution, with wits enough, in fine, to take fire at a captious word, which signifies to it always: Gold and Pleasure! If we comprise in it all those who hold out their hands for an alms, for lawful wages, or the five francs that are granted

Ioläus by Edward Carpenter

Author: Edward Carpenter
Published: 1908
Language: English
Wordcount: 38,334 / 163 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 60.2
LoC Categories: AC, D

Downloads: 2,567
Added to site: 2010.02.21
mnybks.net#: 26730
Origin: www.fordham.edu

Genres: Reference, Gay/Lesbian, History

with this fraternity in arms, in #Sparta# and in #Crete#, are described with care and at considerable length in the following extract from Muller’s History and Antiquities of the Doric Race, book iv., ch. 4, par. 6:

“At Sparta the party loving was called eispnelas and his affection was termed a breathing in, or inspiring (eispnein); which expresses the pure and mental connection between the two persons, and corresponds with the name of the other, viz.: aitas i.e., listener or hearer. Now it appears to have been the practice for every youth of good character to have his lover; and on the other hand every well-educated man was bound by custom to be the lover of some youth. Instances of this connection are furnished by several of the royal family of Sparta; thus, Agesilaus, while he still belonged to the herd (agele) of youths, was the hearer (aitas) of Lysander, and himself had in his turn also a hearer; his son Archidamus was the l

Lost Illusions by Honoré de Balzac

The trilogy known as Lost Illusions consists of: Two Poets, A Distinguished Provincial at Paris, Eve and David.In many references parts one and three are combined under the title Lost Illusions and A Distinguished Provincial at Paris is given its individual title. Following this trilogy is a sequel, Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life, which is set directly following the end of Eve and David.

Author: Honoré de Balzac
Language: English
Wordcount: 252,159 / 722 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 58.7
LoC Category: PQ

Downloads: 5,370
Added to site: 2004.08.12
mnybks.net#: 8944
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Gay/Lesbian

his head, and consequently was fain to earn a living by some lawful industry. A bargain was struck. M. le Comte de Maucombe, disguised in a provincial printer’s jacket, set up, read, and corrected the decrees which forbade citizens to harbor aristocrats under pain of death; while the “bear,” now a “gaffer,” printed the copies and duly posted them, and the pair remained safe and sound.

In 1795, when the squall of the Terror had passed over, Nicolas Sechard was obliged to look out for another jack-of-all-trades to be compositor, reader, and foreman in one; and an Abbe who declined the oath succeeded the Comte de Maucombe as soon as the First Consul restored public worship. The Abbe became a Bishop at the Restoration, and in after days the Count and the Abbe met and sat together on the same bench of the House of Peers.

In 1795 Jerome-Nicolas had not known how to read or write; in 1802 he had made no progress in either art; but by allowing a handsome margin for “wear and tear” in his estimates, he