The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1569-70 by John Lothrop Motley

Author: John Lothrop Motley
Language: English
Wordcount: 13,653 / 47 pg
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mnybks.net#: 5179
Genre: History

had been the regular practice in the Netherlands, nor had the reigning houses often had occasion to accuse the estates of parsimony. It was, however, not wonderful that the Duke of Alva should be impatient at the continued existence of this provincial privilege. A country of condemned criminals, a nation whose universal neck might at any moment be laid upon the block without ceremony, seemed hardly fit to hold the purse-strings, and to dispense alms to its monarch. The Viceroy was impatient at this arrogant vestige of constitutional liberty. Moreover, although he had taken from the Netherlanders nearly all the attributes of freemen, he was unwilling that they should enjoy the principal privilege of slaves, that of being fed and guarded at their master’s expense. He had therefore summoned a general assembly of the provincial estates in Brussels, and on the 20th of March, 1569, had caused the following decrees to be laid before them.

A tax of the hundredth penny, or one per cent., was laid upon all proper

History of France by Charlotte Mary Yonge

Author: Charlotte Mary Yonge
Published: 1882
Language: English
Wordcount: 31,300 / 99 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 65.2
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Added to site: 2005.12.13
mnybks.net#: 11976
Genre: History

ule, the troubadours never ceased to stir up the sons of Henry II. against him.

7. Philip II. (1180–1223).–Powerful in fact as Henry II. was, it was his gathering so large a part of France under his rule which was, in the end, to build up the greatness of the French kings. What had held them in check was the existence of the great fiefs or provinces, each with its own line of dukes or counts, and all practically independent of the king. But now nearly all the provinces of southern and western France were gathered into the hand of a single ruler; and though he was a Frenchman in blood, yet, as he was King of England, this ruler seemed to his French subjects no Frenchman, but a foreigner. They began therefore to look to the French king to free them from a foreign ruler; and the son of Louis VII., called Philip Augustus, was ready to take advantage of their disposition. Philip was a really able man, making up by address for want of personal courage. He set himself to lower the power of the house o

History of Friedrich II of Prussia, appendix by Thomas Carlyle

Author: Thomas Carlyle
Language: English
Wordcount: 8,853 / 32 pg
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Genre: History

les farther north is REINSBERG (properly RHYNSBERG), where Friedrich as Crown-Prince lived his happiest few years. The details of which were familiar to us long ago,–and no doubt dwell clear and soft, in their appropriate “pale moonlight,” in Friedrich’s memory on this occasion. Some time after his Accession, he gave the place to Prince Henri, who lived there till 1802. It is now fallen all dim; and there is nothing at New Ruppin but a remembrance.

To the hither edge of this Rhyn-Luoh, from Berlin, I guess there may be five-and-twenty miles, in a northwest direction; from Potsdam, whence Friedrich starts to-day, about, the same distance north-by-west; “at Seelenhorst,” where Fromme waits him, Friedrich has already had 30 miles of driving,–rate 10 miles an hour, as we chance to observe. Notable things, besides the Spade- husbandries he is intent on, solicit his remembrance in this region. Of Freisack and “Heavy-Peg” with her didactic batterings there, I suppose he, in those fixed times, knows nothing, pro

The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1568 part 2 by John Lothrop Motley

Author: John Lothrop Motley
Language: English
Wordcount: 20,791 / 67 pg
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Genre: History

d the post with consummate tenacity. Charge after charge, volley after volley, from the overwhelming force brought against them, failed to loosen the fierce grip with which they held this key to the whole situation. Before they could be driven from the dykes, their comrades arrived, when all their antagonists at once made a hurried retreat to their camp.

Very much the same tactics were now employed by the Duke, as in the engagement near Selwaert Abbey. He was resolved that this affair, also, should be a hunt, not a battle; but foresaw that it was to be a more successful one. There was no loophole of escape, so that after a little successful baiting, the imprisoned victims would be forced to spring from their lurking-place, to perish upon his spears. On his march from Reyden that morning, he had taken care to occupy every farm-house, every building of whatever description along the road, with his troops. He had left a strong guard on the bridge at Reyden, and had thus closed carefully every avenue. T

Iron Making in the Olden Times by H.G. Nicholls

The remarkable revival and development that has recently taken place in the Iron Works of the Forest of Dean, and the consequent improvement which has accrued to the district, proves conclusively that its condition and prospects are largely dependent upon such manufacture. Impressed with this fact, it has occurred to the Author that a more particular account of them than has been given in his former work on the Forest might prove interesting to the numerous individuals with whom they are connected.

Author: H.G. Nicholls
Published: 1866
Language: English
Wordcount: 25,322 / 81 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 68.1
LoC Category: D

Downloads: 594
Added to site: 2008.01.17
mnybks.net#: 19756
Genre: History

e tract of land yet called the Abbot’s Woods, were granted most likely at this period, and afford some data for determining the capacity of the Flaxley works.

At the commencement of his reign (1216), Henry III. commanded “John de Monmouth to cause Richard de Eston to have his forge working in the Forest of Dean, at Staunton, according to the Charter of Henry II.” {12a}

In the same year, “the Constable of St. Briavell is ordered to remove, without delay, all forges from the Forest of Dean, except the King’s demesne forges, which belong to the Castle of St. Briavell, and ought to be sustained with trunks and old trees wherever they are found in the demesnes in the Forest–excepting two forges belonging to Ralph Avenell, concerning which he has the charter of King John, and excepting four ‘Blissahiis;’ Will. de Dene, & Robert de Alba Mara, & Will. de Abbenhale, & Thomas de Blakencia, and excepting the forges of our servants of St. Briavells, which ought to be sustained with dry and dead

The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1568 part 1 by John Lothrop Motley

Author: John Lothrop Motley
Language: English
Wordcount: 19,382 / 64 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 46.5
LoC Category: D

Downloads: 278
mnybks.net#: 5177
Genre: History

e in which already such bloody progress had been made.

And under this new decree, the executions certainly did not slacken. Men in the highest and the humblest positions were daily and hourly dragged to the stake. Alva, in a single letter to Philip, coolly estimated the number of executions which were to take place immediately after the expiration of holy week, “at eight hundred heads.” Many a citizen, convicted of a hundred thousand florins and of no other crime, saw himself suddenly tied to a horse’s tail, with his hands fastened behind him, and so dragged to the gallows. But although wealth was an unpardonable sin, poverty proved rarely a protection. Reasons sufficient could always be found for dooming the starveling laborer as well as the opulent burgher. To avoid the disturbances created in the streets by the frequent harangues or exhortations addressed to the bystanders by the victims on their way to the scaffold, a new gag was invented. The tongue of each prisoner was screwed into an iron rin

The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 by E. H. and J. A. Robertson Blair, Editors

Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century.

Author: E. H. and J. A. Robertson Blair, Editors
Language: English
Wordcount: 96,389 / 281 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 47.7
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Added to site: 2005.04.27
mnybks.net#: 10188
Genre: History

igious labors among the heathen tribes.

A naval officer, Sebastian de Pineda, sends from Nueva España (1619) to the king a paper on ships and shipbuilding in the Philippines. He begins by describing various kinds of timber used for this purpose; then enumerates, the shipyards in the islands, and the wages paid to the workmen. Fourteen hundred carpenters were formerly employed at one time in the Cavite shipyard alone; but half of them were killed or captured by the Moros in 1617, many have died from overwork, and many others have fled to parts unknown because they had been unpaid for five years. Iron is brought to Manila from China and Japan, and wrought by the Chinese and Indian artisans; the Chinese smith “works from midnight until sunset,” and earns less than one real a day. Iron should be imported from Biscay, however, for some special purposes. Much useful information is given as to the material, quality, and prices of rigging and canvas. Pineda makes recommendations as to the shipment to Manila of var

The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 by Emma Helen Blair

Author: Emma Helen Blair
Published: 1905
Language: English
Wordcount: 98,225 / 292 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 55.9
LoC Category: DS

Downloads: 362
Added to site: 2008.07.08
mnybks.net#: 21465
Genre: History

departs from Manila on his way to Japan. Certain Dutchmen, prisoners at Manila, are converted; some of these, and some discontented Spaniards, undertake to escape from the islands, but most of the fugitives come to grief. The Dutch are at swords’ points with the natives of Java and Amboyna. The Spanish relief ships sent to Ternate encounter the Dutch and gain some advantage over them. A chief in Celebes and another in Siao have sent their sons to be educated in the Jesuit college at Manila; and to the former have been sent some soldiers and a missionary. The Camucones pirates were unusually daring in the year 1636, and carried away many captives from Samar; but on their return to their own country many of them perished by storms or by enemies. The Mindanao raid of the same year, and Corcuera’s Mindanao campaign, are briefly described. The ruler of Jolo is hostile, and Corcuera is going thither to humble the Moro’s pride. In Japan, all persons having Portuguese or Castilian blood have been exiled to Macao.