History of English Humour, Vol. 1 by Alfred Guy Kingan L’Estrange

Author: Alfred Guy Kingan L’Estrange
Published: 1878
Language: English
Wordcount: 84,728 / 253 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 52
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 663
Added to site: 2006.05.03
mnybks.net#: 13347
Genre: Humor

quire to be fed as it were, and although they can enjoy what is embellished by others, have no original observation. Thus, although Herbert Mayo is substantially correct in saying that “humour is the sentiment of the ludicrous,” he might have added that there is a difference between the two in our knowledge of them. In the former, the creative mind is more marked, and, a man though he laughs much, if he be dull in words is only considered to have mirth, i.e., joyousness or a sense of the ludicrous, not humour. The gift can only be brought prominently forward in speech or writing, and thus humour comes to be often regarded as a kind of ingredient or seasoning in a speech or book, if not actually synonymous with certain sentences or expressions. Still we always confine the name to human productions, as, for instance, gestures, sayings, writings, pictures, and plays.

The recognition of the mental character of humour did not necessarily imply any knowledge as to the authority, instability, or cons

Punch, or the London Charivari by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1920
Language: English
Wordcount: 13,864 / 49 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 72.5
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 290
Added to site: 2006.04.04
mnybks.net#: 13318
Genre: Humor

such as has never been exercised by any statesman before or after. When he rises to speak in the House all eyes are riveted on him as though with a vice until he has finished speaking. Even when he has finished they sometimes have to be removed by the Serjeant-at-Arms with a chisel. His speeches have the moral fervour and intensity of one of the Minor Prophets–NAHUM or AMOS, in the opinion of some critics, though I personally incline to MALACHI or HABAKKUK. This personal magnetism which Mr. LLOYD GEORGE radiates in the House he radiates no less in 10, Downing Street, where a special radiatorium has been added to the breakfast-room to radiate it. Imagine an April morning, a kingfisher on a woody stream, poplar-leaves in the wind, a shower of sugar shaken suddenly from a sifter, and you have the man.

It has been said that Mr. LLOYD GEORGE has quarrelled with some of his nearest friends; but this again is a thing that might happen to anybody. Mr. LLOYD GEORGE may have had certain slight differences of op

Punch, or the London Charivari by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1920
Language: English
Wordcount: 14,132 / 49 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 67.1
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 325
Added to site: 2007.10.07
mnybks.net#: 18441
Genre: Humor

s why that poor man was carrying a typewriter. I wonder why everybody else in the Tube carries an “attaché-case.” It has been calculated that if all the attaché-cases which get on to the train at Hammersmith at 9 A.M. were left on the platform, six men or twelve women or three horses could take their place in every car. That means about ninety more men or one-hundred-and-eighty more women or forty-five more horses could leave Hammersmith between 9 A.M. and 9.30. So that if attaché-cases were forbidden the traffic problem would be practically solved.

Why shouldn’t they be forbidden? It depends, of course, on what is inside the cases; and nobody knows that for certain. But one can guess. I have been guessing for a long time. At first I thought they were full of very confidential papers. In the old days the attaché-case was the peculiar trademark of private secretaries and diplomats and high-up people like that. Even attachés carried them sometimes. The very lowest a man

The History and Records of the Elephant Club by Q. K. Philander Doesticks

Author: Q. K. Philander Doesticks (Mortimer Thomson)
Published: 1836
Language: English
Wordcount: 67,038 / 202 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 61.5
LoC Category: PZ

Downloads: 522
Added to site: 2010.05.08
mnybks.net#: 27643
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Young Readers, Humor

m, aside.

“Myndert Van Dam,” suggested the gentleman speaking for himself.

“Yes,” resumed Spout, “Myndert Van Dam.”

As they shook hands, Mr. Dropper’s attention was called in another direction. He desired his companions to notice the fact that a man was approaching with his umbrella, and having bought and lost too many articles of that description, he should not stand unmoved, and see the last one vanish from his sight.

[Illustration]

An individual of small stature, apparently about forty-five years of age, with hair of an undeniable, though not an undyeable red approached, holding over his head a silk umbrella.

Mr. Dropper stepped forward and confronted him. He said he was aware that if every man were compelled to account for the possession of that which he claimed as his own, the world would hear some rich developments, in a moral point of view, respecting the tenure of property; and it was precisely for this reason that he had stopped him in the street. He inquired

Punch, or the London Charivari by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1916
Language: English
Wordcount: 12,673 / 45 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 71.1
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 292
Added to site: 2007.10.07
mnybks.net#: 18434
Genre: Humor

lue of several thousands of pounds has been stolen, are being invested by the police.”–Morning Paper.

In Exchequer Bonds, no doubt. But we hope they have reserved a few pairs of bracelets for the thieves when they catch them.

* * * * *

MR. JOHN’S PORTRAIT OF MR. GEORGE.

The generally favourable opinion of MR. AUGUSTUS JOHN’S striking portrait of MR. LLOYD GEORGE is not shared by everybody. The following criticism of the picture has reached us, and as it represents a point of view which, so far as we know, has not found sympathy in the Press opinions which have already appeared, we print it for the edification of the artist, the sitter and any others who may have a few moments to devote to the subject.

I should like to say (writes our correspondent) on behalf of myself and of many worthy members of my congregation that MR. AUGUSTUS JOHN has missed a great opportunity in painting his portrait of our greatest Welshman.

In the first place, surely it lacks dignit

His Lordship’s Leopard by David Dwight Wells

WARNING!The ensuing work is a serious attempt to while away an idle hour. The best criticism that the author received of “Her Ladyship’s Elephant” was from an old lady who wrote him that it had made her forget a toothache; the most discouraging, from a critic who approached the book as serious literature and treated it according to the standards of the higher criticism.The author takes this occasion to state that he has never been guilty of writing literature, serious or otherwise, and that if any one considers this book a fit subject for the application of the higher criticism, he will treat it as a just ground for an action for libel.If the minimum opus possesses an intrinsic value, it lies in the explanation of the whereabouts of a Spanish gunboat, which, during our late unpleasantness with Spain, the yellow journalists insisted was patrolling the English Channel, in spite of the fact that the U. S. Board of Strategy knew that every available ship belonging to that nation was better employed somewhere else.Should this exposé ruffle another English see, so much the worse for the Bishop.

Author: David Dwight Wells
Published: 1900
Language: English
Wordcount: 49,460 / 154 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 70.8
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 447
Added to site: 2010.01.07
mnybks.net#: 26229
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Humor

inkerton’s force for habitual drunkenness,” interjected his subordinate.

“Just so,” said the editor, “and anxious to get a job in consequence. He’ll be only too glad to run the whole show for us. The city shall be watched, and the first time ‘The Purple Kangaroo’ is used in a suspicious sense we’ll arrest the offenders, discover the plot, and the Daily Leader, as the defender of the nation and the people’s bulwark, will increase its circulation a hundred thousand copies! It makes me dizzy to think of it! I tell you what it is, Marchmont, that subeditorship is still vacant, and if you put this through, the place is yours.”

The reporter grasped his chief’s hand.

“That’s white of you, boss,” he said, “and I’ll do it no matter what it costs or who gets hurt in the process.”

“Right you are!” cried his employer. “The man who edits this paper has got to hustle. Now don’t let the grass grow under your feet, and we’ll have a drink to celebrate.”

When the chief offers to set

Punch, or the London Charivari by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1916
Language: English
Wordcount: 12,654 / 44 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 83
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 351
Added to site: 2007.10.07
mnybks.net#: 18433
Genre: Humor

ess, Percy!–think of all your dear ones at ‘ome and turn back before it is too late!”

Percy shuddered. “I might try the Engineers,” he said hopelessly, “but I don’t—-“

“If,” said Private Penny in the still tones of despair, “I have druv you to this, I shall cut me throat. I can’t live with that on me conscience. ‘Ave you thought of the danger of mining and sapping? ‘Ave you kinsidered field telegrafts? ‘Ave you–‘ot-‘eaded and impulsive as you are–‘ave you kinsidered anything? Percy, if you’re set on this job, tell me quick, and put me out of me agony!”

“No,” said Percy abruptly. “But”–with sudden misgiving–“w-what can I do? I’m on my way to join and I must join something.”

Private Penny pushed his mug over to be re-filled. “I’m an infantryman myself,” he said carelessly, “and I speaks as one that knows. And wot I says is–if you wants a cheerful protected kinder life, with a quiet ‘ole to ‘ide yer ‘ead in–if you wants rest and comfort, kimbined wi

Punch, or the London Charivari by Various Authors

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1914
Language: English
Wordcount: 13,957 / 49 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 72.4
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 300
Added to site: 2007.10.13
mnybks.net#: 18523
Genre: Humor

Ashore and Afloat.

We don’t recommend this as a beginning, however. Very often the captain, who wants to steer himself, resents an additional shoulder at the wheel–and invites you to the top of the masthead.

* * * * *

[Illustration: MORE BRAINY IDEAS OF OUR DRAPERS.

CUSTOMER BEING CONDUCTED TO THE SPRING MILLINERY DEPARTMENT.]

* * * * *

THE MOON.

[IMPOSSIBLE PLAY SERIES.]

A SUPER-PSYCHOLOGICAL DRAMA IN ONE ACT.

Persons of the Play.

Lord Gumthorpe. Lady Gastwyck. Angela Thynne. Stud, a butler.

[Author to Printer.–Oblige me by reversing your usual practice, and printing the text in italics and the stage directions in roman type. My request will, I hope, prove intelligible.]

Scene.–The drawing-room at Lady Gastwyck’s. A large, low room with a mullioned window at the back through which moonlight steals. The decoration of the room is Adams’, though of rather a self-c