The Light of Egypt, vol 2 by Wagner/Burgoyne

Author: Wagner/Burgoyne
Language: English
Wordcount: 48,659 / 149 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 45.5
LoC Category: B

Downloads: 1,957
mnybks.net#: 7205
Genre: Philosophy

ive them to the world as a companion to the first volume of “The Light of Egypt.”

It is the duty of Occult students to familiarize themselves with the subjects herein discussed. They should know the ideas of our ancestors regarding them and be familiar with their thought, in order to appreciate the sublime wisdom and knowledge of Nature as taught by them, otherwise we are sure to do them, as well as ourselves, great injustice. The history of Occultism bears out the fact that there is very little that is new to the present time.

The arrangement and classification of thought differs during each cycle of time on the different spirals, and, like the fruitage on lower rounds of Nature’s progressive wheel of destiny, variety and quality are diverse, so, likewise, do we find the mental manifestations. This age, however, is blessed with a great variety and abundance of thought, in clear-cut language, that should enlighten the races of the Earth with Mother Nature’s modus operandi in every department of human th

The Life of the Bee by Maurice Maeterlinck

One of the most curious of books that have appeared in many months is “The Life of the Bee,” by Maurice Maeterlinck. From one point of view it is a nature book–a conscientious and intimate study of bee life, showing not only diligent reading, but dose personal observation. It is all this, but it is also a great deal more. Maeterlinck is one of those rarely gifted minds who cannot treat even of commonplace things without striking out some new flash of light from them; while with a subject like that of the bee, with all the interest of its complex social life, the unfathomed questions of what these little creatures know and think and feel, the delicate hair line of division between reason and instinct, Maeterlinck has a theme from which he has developed a sort of prose poem full of dreamy yet subtle philosophy of life and life’s mysteries. Translated by Alfred Sutro, 1914.

Author: Maurice Maeterlinck
Published: 1901
Language: English
Wordcount: 60,061 / 178 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 49.1
LoC Categories: Q, B

Downloads: 2,127
mnybks.net#: 4684
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Science, Philosophy

ake towards the truth. I shall state nothing, therefore, that I have not verified myself, or that is not so fully accepted in the text-books as to render further verification superfluous. My facts shall be as accurate as though they appeared in a practical manual or scientific monograph, but I shall relate them in a somewhat livelier fashion than such works would allow, shall group them more harmoniously together, and blend them with freer and more mature reflections. The reader of this book will not learn therefrom how to manage a hive; but he will know more or less all that can with any certainty be known of the curious, profound, and intimate side of its inhabitants. Nor will this be at the cost of what still remains to be learned. I shall pass over in silence the hoary traditions that, in the country and many a book, still constitute the legend of the hive. Whenever there be doubt, disagreement, hypothesis, when I arrive at the unknown, I shall declare it loyally; you will find that we often shall halt be

Kant’s Theory of Knowledge by Harold Arthur Prichard

This book is an attempt to think out the nature and tenability of Kant’s Transcendental Idealism, an attempt animated by the conviction that even the elucidation of Kant’s meaning, apart from any criticism, is impossible without a discussion on their own merits of the main issues which he raises.

Author: Harold Arthur Prichard
Published: 1909
Language: English
Wordcount: 98,903 / 307 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 54.6
LoC Category: B

Downloads: 2,318
Added to site: 2010.06.06
mnybks.net#: 28058
Genre: Philosophy

e conception A, although it stands in relation to it. In the former case the judgement is called analytic, in the latter synthetic.[9] ‘All bodies are extended’ is an analytic judgement; ‘All bodies are heavy’ is synthetic. It immediately follows that only synthetic judgements extend our knowledge; for in making an analytic judgement we are only clearing up our conception of the subject. This process yields no new knowledge, for it only gives us a clearer view of what we know already. Further, all judgements based on experience are synthetic, for it would be absurd to base an analytical judgement on experience, when to make the judgement we need not go beyond our own conceptions. On the other hand, a priori judgements are sometimes analytic and sometimes synthetic. For, besides analytical judgements, all judgements in mathematics and certain judgements which underlie physics are asserted independently of experience, and they are synthetic.

[9] B. 10, M. 7.

Here Kant is

Où va la monde? by Walther Rathenau

Author: Walther Rathenau
Published: 1922
Language: French
Wordcount: 115,777 / 403 pg
LoC Category: B

Downloads: 1,009
Added to site: 2007.05.12
mnybks.net#: 16914
Genre: Philosophy

, ordonner des sacrements: rien de plus vain que ces pieux artifices. Certes, tout cela suppose l’existence, au plus profond de notre être, de forces capables de créer de nouvelles orientations; mais quelque habile qu’elle soit, jamais l’interprétation humaine ne réussira à remplacer par des notions morales la vieille base faite de miracles palpables; les convictions transcendantes survivent toujours dans notre coeur, mais elles exigent une nouvelle langue, de nouvelles représentations et un éclairage nouveau. Les obscures profondeurs de notre conscience la plus intime, la plus à l’abri du monde extérieur, sont loin d’être vides; lorsque nous consentons à y descendre, nous y retrouvons chaque fois la certitude de l’infini, du côté divin de la création, l’annonce de la vocation de notre âme et de nos forces supra-intellectuelles, le mystère du royaume spirituel.

Nous avons traité de ces cho

Parmenides by Plato

The awe with which Plato regarded the character of ‘the great’ Parmenides has extended to the dialogue which he calls by his name. None of the writings of Plato have been more copiously illustrated, both in ancient and modern times, and in none of them have the interpreters been more at variance with one another.

Author: Plato
Language: English
Wordcount: 36,066 / 106 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 47.9
LoC Categories: B, PA

Downloads: 2,630
mnybks.net#: 5700
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Philosophy

Eleatics. For of all the pre-Socratic philosophers, he speaks of them with the greatest respect. But he could hardly have passed upon them a more unmeaning slight than to ascribe to their great master tenets the reverse of those which he actually held.

Two preliminary remarks may be made. First, that whatever latitude we may allow to Plato in bringing together by a ‘tour de force,’ as in the Phaedrus, dissimilar themes, yet he always in some way seeks to find a connexion for them. Many threads join together in one the love and dialectic of the Phaedrus. We cannot conceive that the great artist would place in juxtaposition two absolutely divided and incoherent subjects. And hence we are led to make a second remark: viz. that no explanation of the Parmenides can be satisfactory which does not indicate the connexion of the first and second parts. To suppose that Plato would first go out of his way to make Parmenides attack the Platonic Ideas, and then proceed to a similar but more fatal assault on his ow

The Life of Reason by George Santayana

This Dover edition, first published in 1980, is an unabridged republication of volume one of The Life of Reason; or the Phases of Human Progress, originally published by Charles Scribner’s Sons in 1905. This volume contains the general introduction to the entire five-volume series

Author: George Santayana (Jorge Augustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana)
Published: 1905
Language: English
Wordcount: 319,422 / 974 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 46.7
LoC Category: B

Downloads: 4,557
Added to site: 2005.02.14
mnybks.net#: 9616
Genres: Philosophy, Post-1930

the Life of Reason, if it were brought to perfection, intelligence would be at once the universal method of practice and its continual reward. All reflection would then be applicable in action and all action fruitful in happiness. Though this be an ideal, yet everyone gives it from time to time a partial embodiment when he practises useful arts, when his passions happily lead him to enlightenment, or when his fancy breeds visions pertinent to his ultimate good. Everyone leads the Life of Reason in so far as he finds a steady light behind the world’s glitter and a clear residuum of joy beneath pleasure or success. No experience not to be repented of falls without its sphere. Every solution to a doubt, in so far as it is not a new error, every practical achievement not neutralised by a second maladjustment consequent upon it, every consolation not the seed of another greater sorrow, may be gathered together and built into this edifice. The Life of Reason is the happy marriage of two elements–impulse and ideati

Phaedo by Plato

“The dead are first of all judged according to their deeds, and those who are incurable are thrust into Tartarus, from which they never come out.”

Author: Plato
Language: English
Wordcount: 42,812 / 122 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 63.8
LoC Categories: B, PA

Downloads: 3,887
mnybks.net#: 5701
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Philosophy

raid of greater dangers, and temperate because they desire greater pleasures. But he disdains this balancing of pleasures and pains, which is the exchange of commerce and not of virtue. All the virtues, including wisdom, are regarded by him only as purifications of the soul. And this was the meaning of the founders of the mysteries when they said, ‘Many are the wand-bearers but few are the mystics.’ (Compare Matt. xxii.: ‘Many are called but few are chosen.’) And in the hope that he is one of these mystics, Socrates is now departing. This is his answer to any one who charges him with indifference at the prospect of leaving the gods and his friends.

Still, a fear is expressed that the soul upon leaving the body may vanish away like smoke or air. Socrates in answer appeals first of all to the old Orphic tradition that the souls of the dead are in the world below, and that the living come from them. This he attempts to found on a philosophical assumption that all opposites–e.g. less, greater; weaker, str

The Sense of Beauty by George Santayana

This little work contains the chief ideas gathered together for a course of lectures on the theory and history of aesthetics given at Harvard College from 1892 to 1895. The only originality I can claim is that which may result from the attempt to put together the scattered commonplaces of criticism into a system, under the inspiration of a naturalistic psychology. I have studied sincerity rather than novelty, and if any subject, as for instance the excellence of tragedy, is presented in a new light, the change consists only in the stricter application to a complex subject of the principles acknowledged to obtain in our simple judgments. My effort throughout has been to recall those fundamental aesthetic feelings the orderly extension of which yields sanity of judgment and distinction of taste.

Author: George Santayana (Jorge Augustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana)
Published: 1896
Language: English
Wordcount: 71,054 / 217 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 45.8
LoC Category: BH

Downloads: 2,999
Added to site: 2008.10.09
mnybks.net#: 22302
Genre: Philosophy

his expressiveness of the sky is due to certain qualities of the sensation, which bind it to all things happy and pure, and, in a mind in which the essence of purity and happiness is embodied in an idea of God, bind it also to that idea.

So it may happen that the most arbitrary and unreal theories, which must be rejected as general explanations of aesthetic life, may be reinstated as particular moments of it. Those intuitions which we call Platonic are seldom scientific, they seldom explain the phenomena or hit upon the actual law of things, but they are often the highest expression of that activity which they fail to make comprehensible. The adoring lover cannot understand the natural history of love; for he is all in all at the last and supreme stage of its development. Hence the world has always been puzzled in its judgment of the Platonists; their theories are so extravagant, yet their wisdom seems so great. Platonism is a very refined and beautiful expression of our natural instincts, it embodies