Tono Bungay by H.G. Wells

A semi-autobiographical satire of Edwardian advertising and patent-medicines.

Author: H.G. Wells
Published: 1909
Language: English
Wordcount: 131,815 / 759 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 58.2
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 2,948
mnybks.net#: 7350
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Satire

through the village. He still thought he knew his place–and mine. I did not know him, but I would have liked dearly to have asked him if he remembered my mother, if either my uncle or old Lichtenstein had been man enough to stand being given away like that.

In that English countryside of my boyhood every human being had a “place.” It belonged to you from your birth like the colour of your eyes, it was inextricably your destiny. Above you were your betters, below you were your inferiors, and there were even an unstable questionable few, cases so disputable that you might for the rough purposes of every day at least, regard them as your equals. Head and centre of our system was Lady Drew, her “leddyship,” shrivelled, garrulous, with a wonderful memory for genealogies and very, very old, and beside her and nearly as old, Miss Somerville, her cousin and companion. These two old souls lived like dried-up kernels in the great shell of Bladesover House, the shell that had once been gaily full of fops, of fin

The Toys of Peace by Saki

The Toys of Peace — Louise — Tea — The Disappearance of Crispina Umberleigh — The Wolves of Cernogratz — Louis — The Guests — The Penance — The Phantom Luncheon — A Bread and Butter Miss — Bertie’s Christmas Eve — Forewarned — The Interlopers — Quail Seed — Canossa — The Threat — Excepting Mrs. Pentherby — Mark — The Hedgehog — The Mappined Life — Fate — The Bull — Morlvera — Shock Tactics — The Seven Cream Jugs — The Occasional Garden — The Sheep — The Oversight — Hyacinth — The Image of the Lost Soul — The Purple of the Balkan Kings — The Cupboard of the Yesterdays — For the Duration of the War

Author: Saki (H.H. Munro)
Published: 1919
Language: English
Wordcount: 56,910 / 164 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 73.5
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 1,526
mnybks.net#: 6096
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Satire, War, Short Story Collection

e when I first remember them in the ‘eighties. They used to go about then unkempt and dishevelled, in a sort of smiling rage with the world, and now they’re spruce and jaunty and flamboyantly decorative, like a geranium bed with religious convictions. Laura Kettleway was going on about them in the lift of the Dover Street Tube the other day, saying what a lot of good work they did, and what a loss it would have been if they’d never existed. ‘If they had never existed,’ I said, ‘Granville Barker would have been certain to have invented something that looked exactly like them.’ If you say things like that, quite loud, in a Tube lift, they always sound like epigrams.”

“I think you ought to do something about Louise,” said the dowager.

“I’m trying to think whether she was with me when I called on Ada Spelvexit. I rather enjoyed myself there. Ada was trying, as usual, to ram that odious Koriatoffski woman down my throat, knowing perfectly well that I detest her, and in an unguarded moment she said: ‘

A Traveler from Altruria by William Dean Howells

In the early 1890s, at a fashionable summer resort somewhere on the East Coast, Mr. Twelvemough (a popular author of light fiction) plays host to a vistor from the faraway island of Altruria, come to experience first-hand everyday life in the country which prides itself as the spearhead of democracy and equality.

Author: William Dean Howells
Published: 1892
Language: English
Wordcount: 65,834 / 186 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 82.6
LoC Category: PS

Downloads: 687
mnybks.net#: 3726
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Satire, Fiction and Literature

the Altrurian, with a simplicity so fine that it was a long time before I could believe it quite real, “that I shall approach it so much more intelligently with a little instruction from you. You say that your social divisions are voluntary. But do I understand that those who serve among you do not wish to do so?”

“Well, I don’t suppose they would serve if they could help it,” I replied.

“Surely,” said the Altrurian, with a look of horror, “you don’t mean that they are slaves.”

“Oh no! oh no!” I said; “the war put an end to that. We are all free now, black and white.”

“But if they do not wish to serve, and are not held in peculiar honor for serving–“

“I see that my word ‘voluntary’ has misled you,” I put in. “It isn’t the word exactly. The divisions among us are rather a process of natural selection. You will see, as you get better acquainted with the workings of our institutions, that there are no arbitrary distinctions here but the fitness of the work for the man and the

Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion by Mark Twain

Author: Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
Language: English
Wordcount: 16,704 / 53 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.4
LoC Category: G

Downloads: 1,725
mnybks.net#: 7067
Genres: Travel, Satire

es. Late in the day, still another ship came up out of the distance, but the men noted with a pang that her course was one which would not bring her nearer. Their remnant of life was nearly spent; their lips and tongues were swollen, parched, cracked with eight days’ thirst; their bodies starved; and here was their last chance gliding relentlessly from them; they would not be alive when the next sun rose. For a day or two past the men had lost their voices, but now Captain Rounceville whispered, “Let us pray.” The Portuguese patted him on the shoulder in sign of deep approval. All knelt at the base of the oar that was waving the signal-coat aloft, and bowed their heads. The sea was tossing; the sun rested, a red, rayless disk, on the sea-line in the west. When the men presently raised their heads they would have roared a hallelujah if they had had a voice–the ship’s sails lay wrinkled and flapping against her masts–she was going about! Here was rescue at last, and in the very last instant of time tha

The Sot-weed Factor by Ebenezer Cook

In which is Describ’d The Laws, Government, Courts and Constitutions of the Country.

Author: Ebenezer Cook
Published: 1865
Language: English
Wordcount: 7,416 / 21 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 90.5
LoC Category: PN

Downloads: 581
Added to site: 2007.05.08
mnybks.net#: 16837
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Satire

Pict in Battel fought,

Or undisguis’d his Mistress sought;

And knowing well his Ware was good,

Refus’d to screen it with a Hood;

His visage dun, and chin that ne’er

Did Raizor feel or Scissers bare,

Or knew the Ornament of Hair,

Look’d sternly Grim, surprized with Fear,

I spur’d my Horse as he drew near:

But Rhoan who better knew than I,

The little Cause I had to fly;

Seem’d by his solemn steps and pace,

Resolv’d I shou’d the Specter face,

Nor faster mov’d, tho’ spur’d and lick’d,

Than Balaam’s Ass by Prophet kick’d.

Kekicknitop (q) the Heathen cry’d;

How is it, Tom, my Friend reply’d,

Judging from thence the Brute was civil,

I boldly fac’d the Courteous Devil;

And lugging out a Dram of Rum,

I gave his Tawny worship some:

Who in his language as I guess,

(My Guide informing me no less,)

Implored the (r) Devil, me to bless.

Defence of Harriet Shelley by Mark Twain

Author: Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
Language: English
Wordcount: 15,931 / 52 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 57.3
LoC Category: PS

Downloads: 1,963
mnybks.net#: 7042
Genre: Satire

ne at a time the contestants enter, clothed regardless of expense in what each considers the perfection of style and taste, and walk down the vacant central space and back again with that multitude of critical eyes on them. All that the competitor knows of fine airs and graces he throws into his carriage, all that he knows of seductive expression he throws into his countenance. He may use all the helps he can devise: watch- chain to twirl with his fingers, cane to do graceful things with, snowy handkerchief to flourish and get artful effects out of, shiny new stovepipe hat to assist in his courtly bows; and the colored lady may have a fan to work up her effects with, and smile over and blush behind, and she may add other helps, according to her judgment. When the review by individual detail is over, a grand review of all the contestants in procession follows, with all the airs and graces and all the bowings and smirkings on exhibition at once, and this enables the bench of experts to make the necessary com

Three Sermons and Prayers by Jonathan Swift

On Mutual Subjection
On Sleeping in Church
On the Wisdom of this World
Prayers used by the Dean for Stella

Author: Jonathan Swift
Published: 1744
Language: English
Wordcount: 11,632 / 40 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 59.9
LoC Category: PR

Downloads: 976
mnybks.net#: 6767
Genre: Satire

ounty to mankind? What is there that can give a generous spirit more pleasure and complacency of mind than to consider that he is an instrument of doing much good; that great numbers owe to him, under God, their subsistence, their safety, their health, and the good conduct of their lives? The wickedest man upon earth takes a pleasure in doing good to those he loves; and therefore surely a good Christian, who obeys our Saviour’s commands of loving all men, cannot but take delight in doing good even to his enemies. God, who gives all things to all men, can receive nothing from any; and those among men who do the most good and receive the fewest returns do most resemble the Creator; for which reason St. Paul delivers it as a saying of our Saviour, that “it is more blessed to give than receive.” By this rule, what must become of those things which the world values as the greatest blessings–riches, power, and the like- -when our Saviour plainly determines that the best way to make them blessings is to part with t

Social Pictorial Satire by George du Maurier

Author: George du Maurier (George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier)
Language: English
Wordcount: 16,387 / 54 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 58
LoC Category: PQ

Downloads: 344
Added to site: 2004.07.10
mnybks.net#: 8801
Genre: Satire

touching sight imaginable. The grave was near Thackeray’s, who had died the year before. There were crowds of people, Charles Dickens among them; Canon Hole, a great friend of Leech’s, and who has written most affectionately about him, read the service; and when the coffin was lowered into the grave, John Millais burst into tears and loud sobs, setting an example that was followed all round; we all forgot our manhood and cried like women! I can recall no funeral in my time where simple grief and affection have been so openly and spontaneously displayed by so many strangers as well as friends–not even in France, where people are more demonstrative than here. No burial in Westminster Abbey that I have ever seen ever gave such an impression of universal honour, love, and regret.

“Whom the gods love die young.” He was only forty-six!

I was then invited to join the Punch staff and take Leech’s empty chair at the weekly dinner–and bidden to cut my initials on the table, by his; his monogram as it w