The Women of Tomorrow by William Hard

Author: William Hard
Published: 1910
Language: English
Wordcount: 37,221 / 117 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 75.9
LoC Category: HQ

Downloads: 720
Added to site: 2010.07.20
mnybks.net#: 28484
Genre: Women’s Studies

en prolonged celibacy on the part of large numbers of young men and young women is a great social evil. The consequences of that evil we shall observe later on.[1]

[1] In speaking about celibacy we refer wholly to secular and not at all to religious celibacy.

In the meantime we return to John and Mary.

While John was doing his last year in engineering school, Mary did a year of technical study in the New York School of Philanthropy, or in the St. Louis School of Social Economy, or in the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy, or in the Boston School for Social Workers.

They won’t even let you start in “doing good” nowadays without some training for it. This is wise, considering how much harm doing good can do.

But how the preparation for life does lengthen itself out!

Mary took a civil-service examination and got a job with the State Bureau of Labor. She finished her first year with the Bureau at the same time that John finished his first year with the electrical

The Modern Woman’s Rights Movement by Kaethe Schirmacher

Author: Kaethe Schirmacher
Published: 1912
Language: English
Wordcount: 62,101 / 212 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 52.9
LoC Category: HQ

Downloads: 665
Added to site: 2010.09.11
mnybks.net#: 28960
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genre: Women’s Studies

rican women, being creatures without political rights, were not permitted to perform their duties as delegates, but were directed to leave the convention hall and to occupy places in the spectators’ gallery. But the noble William Lloyd Garrison silently registered a protest by sitting with the women in the gallery.

This procedure clearly indicated to the American women what their next duty should be, and once when Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton came from the gallery to the hotel Mrs. Stanton said, “The first thing which we must do upon our return is to call a convention to discuss the slavery of woman.”

This plan, however, was not executed till eight years later. At that time Elizabeth Cady Stanton, on the occasion of a visit from Lucretia Mott, summoned a number of acquaintances to her home in Seneca Falls, New York. In giving an account of the meeting at Washington, in 1888, at the Conference of Pioneers of the International Council of Women (see Report, pp. 323, 324), she states tha

Women of the Romance Countries by John R. Effinger

This account of the women of the Romance countries does not attempt to trace in detail their gradual evolution, but rather to present, in the proper setting, the most conspicuous examples of their good or evil influence, their bravery or their cowardice, their loyalty or their infidelity, their learning or their illiteracy, their intelligence or their ignorance, throughout the succeeding years.

Author: John R. Effinger
Published: 1907
Language: English
Wordcount: 112,958 / 325 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 31.9
LoC Category: D

Downloads: 522
Added to site: 2006.06.22
mnybks.net#: 13640
Genres: History, Women’s Studies

and, doubtless as one of the consequences of this regulation, it had become the custom for many of the priests to have one or more concubines with whom they, in most cases, lived openly and without shame. The monasteries became, under these conditions, dens of iniquity, and the nunneries were no better. The nunnery of Saint Fara in the eleventh century, according to a contemporary description, was no longer the residence of holy virgins, but a brothel of demoniac females who gave themselves up to all sorts of shameless conduct; and there are many other accounts of the same general tenor. Pope Gregory VII. tried again to do something for the cause of public morality, in 1074, when he issued edicts against both concubinage and simony–or the then prevalent custom of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferment; but the edict was too harsh and unreasonable with regard to the first, inasmuch as it provided that no priest should marry in the future, and that those who already possessed wives or concubines were to

Women of the Romance Countries by John R. Effinger

No one can deny the influence of woman, which has been a potent factor in society, directly or indirectly, ever since the days of Mother Eve. Whether living in Oriental seclusion, or enjoying the freer life of the Western world, she has always played an important part in the onward march of events, and exercised a subtle power in all things, great and small. To appreciate this power properly, and give it a worthy narrative, is ever a difficult and well-nigh impossible task, at least for mortal man. Under the most favorable circumstances, the subject is elusive and difficult of approach, lacking in sequence, and often shrouded in mystery. (Illustrated version available at Project Gutenberg)

Author: John R. Effinger
Language: English
Wordcount: 113,718 / 328 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 32.4
LoC Category: HQ
Series: Women In All Ages and In All Countries

Downloads: 601
Added to site: 2010.06.07
mnybks.net#: 28067
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Women’s Studies, History

, and the priests themselves were steeped in crime and debauchery. In former generations, the Church at Rome had many times issued strict orders against the marriage of the clergy, and, doubtless as one of the consequences of this regulation, it had become the custom for many of the priests to have one or more concubines with whom they, in most cases, lived openly and without shame. The monasteries became, under these conditions, dens of iniquity, and the nunneries were no better. The nunnery of Saint Fara in the eleventh century, according to a contemporary description, was no longer the residence of holy virgins, but a brothel of demoniac females who gave themselves up to all sorts of shameless conduct; and there are many other accounts of the same general tenor. Pope Gregory VII. tried again to do something for the cause of public morality, in 1074, when he issued edicts against both concubinage and simony–or the then prevalent custom of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferment; but the edict was too h

Women of the Teutonic Nations by Hermann Schoenfeld

Author: Hermann Schoenfeld
Language: English
Wordcount: 116,455 / 352 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 56.6
LoC Categories: HQ, DD
Series: Women In All Ages and In All Countries

Downloads: 636
Added to site: 2010.06.15
mnybks.net#: 28149
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Women’s Studies, History

ocillus should be burned at the stake or kept for a future occasion, and this was thrice determined in his favor by the lots cast in his presence by the wise women. Here, as elsewhere, women interpreted the decree of fate. Tacitus mentions Albruna (called Aliruna by Grimm) as an ancient prophetess venerated by the Germans during the expeditions of Drusus and Tiberius in the interior of Germania.

The greatest veneration, however, ever enjoyed by a prophetess, fell to the lot of Veleda during the heroic war of liberation waged against the Romans by the Batavi, a branch of the Chatti, under their great leader Civilis. Veleda’s influence extended far beyond the theatre of the uprising on the “Island of the Batavi.” Johannes Scherr, the historian of German civilization, finds in her name an allusion to Valkyrie, Vala, Volur, thus indicating the quasi-deification of Veleda. In reality, she belonged to the tribe of the Bructeri. She received embassies, formed alliances, and the most precious portions of the b

The Long Day by Dorothy Richardson

Author: Dorothy Richardson
Published: 1905
Language: English
Wordcount: 64,637 / 189 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 67.9
LoC Categories: HN, HQ

Downloads: 796
Added to site: 2010.01.30
mnybks.net#: 26500
Genre: Women’s Studies

go to Chicago till I was twenty. I lived all my life on a farm in Iowa, till I went up to get a job in Chicago after my father died and I was all alone in the world. We lived in the very wildest part of the State–in the part they call the ‘Big Woods.’ Oh, I know all about frontier life. And there’s hardly any kind of ‘roughing it’ that I haven’t done. I was born to it.”

She laughed, opening the stove door, for the elbow of the pipe was now red-hot and threatening conflagration to the thin board partition behind, which divided the little room from that of the next lodger.

A loud thump upon the board partition startled us. We listened for a few moments,–at first with alarm,–and then realized that the noise was only the protest of a sleepy boarder.

Presently, as we continued to talk, the banging of a shoe-heel on the wall grew more insistent. We heard doors opening along the hall, and a high, raucous voice invoked quiet in none too polite phrase. So I said, “Good night,” in a whisper and

The Love Affairs of an Old Maid by Lilian Bell

So the book has been written. The existence of the Old Maid often has been a precarious one; she has been surrounded by danger, once narrowly escaping cremation. But my humanity towards dumb brutes saved her. I might have sacrificed a woman, but I could not kill a cat. So she lives, unconsciously owing her life to her cat.

Author: Lilian Bell
Published: 1893
Language: English
Wordcount: 37,120 / 106 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 65.2
LoC Category: PS

Downloads: 1,147
Added to site: 2007.07.12
mnybks.net#: 17605
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Women’s Studies

your back, to give you confidence and eloquence. But with the latter you are cowed and beaten beforehand, and tongue-tied during the contest.

So she became Alice Asbury, and these two blighted beings took a flat. Before they had been at home from their honeymoon a week she came down to see me, and told me that she hated Asbury.

Imagine a bride whose bouquet, only a month before, you had held at the altar, and heard her promise to love, honor, and obey a man until death did them part, coming to you with a confession like that. Still, if but one half she tells me of him is true, I do not wonder that she hates him.

With her revolutionary, anarchistic completeness, she has renounced the idea of compromise or adaptability as finally as if she had seen and passed the end of the world. There is no more pliability in her with regard to Asbury than there is in a steel rod. How different she used to be with Brandt! How she consulted his wishes and accommodated herself to him!

When a woman b

Magnhild Dust by Bjørnstjerne M. Bjørnson

Author: Bjørnstjerne M. Bjørnson
Published: 1882
Language: English
Wordcount: 61,898 / 179 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 71.2
LoC Category: PT

Downloads: 454
Added to site: 2010.09.10
mnybks.net#: 28953
Origin: gutenberg.org

Genres: Fiction and Literature, Women’s Studies

er her work again. She was a person of medium size, neither thin nor stout, and had a small head with fair hair. The priest, who was heavy and corpulent, came down-stairs after removing his gown; he was smoking, and as he crossed the floor, he said, “There comes a man with fish,” and passed out of the room again.

The youngest girl once more attacked her scales. Magnhild did not know whether she should remain where she was, or go back to the kitchen. She sat on the wood-box by the stove tormented with the uncertainty, when dinner was announced in the adjoining room. All work was put aside, and the little one at the piano closed the instrument. Now when Magnhild was alone and heard the rattling of the knives, she began to cry; for she had not yet eaten a morsel that day. During the meal the priest came out from the dining-room; for it had been decided that he had not bought enough fish. He opened the window and called out to the man to wait until dinner was over. As he turned to go back into the dining-r